Weekly News of the Church

Summer Book Group Our summer book group begins on July 17. The group will meet on Wednesday evenings at the Smith Memorial Parsonage (3281 Waikomo Road) at 6 o’clock for dinner (provided by Kahu on the first night) and then for a discussion which will begin between 6:45 & 7:00. If you are able, please read the Foreword, Preface, Introduction for the first gathering. While supplies last, books are available for $14 at church on Sundays and at the church office during office hours. Please sign up at church for which evenings you plan to attend. ____________________________________________________   GET READY FOR PLANTATION DAYS! “Year of the Paniolo”   KOLOA PLANTATION DAYS RECEPTION Monday, July 22, 4-6 p.m. at the Smith Memorial Parsonage Koloa Union Church will once again host the community as part of Kōloa Plantation Days at a reception called “Plantation-Style Living: An Afternoon of Art, Stories & Refreshment.” Dr. Douglas Duvauchelle will provide live music! Kahu will give a talk at 4:30 on the history of the Smith-Waterhouse Family, the parsonage and neighborhood. Every year he finds something new to share! Click HERE to see promotion of this event on the official Kōloa Plantation Days website. ________________________________ KOLOA PLANTATION DAYS PARADE Saturday, July 27, 10 a.m. (Meet at church at 8:30!)* Koloa Union Church celebrates the Year of the Paniolo by becoming an official “Open & Affirming” congregation of the United Church of Christ: where every cowboy and every cowgirl is welcome—and every city dweller too! We will have dancers this year! Kahu will ride in a red convertible, decorated with our “Open & Affirming” logos, waving at the crowds as we pass by. We will also have...

A Message from Kahu Akana

Simple Solutions On Sunday, I shared a story told by Bryan Stevenson when two police officers pointed guns at him and threatened to “blow off your head.” They threw him up against his car and searched it without a warrant for illegal drugs and weapons. His crime: sitting in his car listening to music for ten or fifteen minutes in front of his home after a long day of work…and being Black. He had just moved into the Atlanta neighborhood and, apparently, a White neighbor saw a Black man sitting in a car and called the police. As the police officers were leaving—after all the neighbors got a chance to watch him in police custody for about fifteen minutes—they said to Bryan, “Consider yourself lucky.” His response: “They were right: I was lucky. I survived.” This story was told by Bryan in the foreword of the book America’s Original Sin by Jim Wallis. Bryan is a Harvard-trained attorney and endured the above-mentioned injustice after a long day of practicing law. In the book, Jim Wallis shares his discover that virtually all African-American parents have what they call “the talk” with their children as they are entering their adolescent years. “The talk” involves telling their kids how to survive an encounter with a police officer—how to live through it. He asked parents if they have this talk with their kids and discovered that 100% of the African-American parents whom he asked did indeed have “the talk” with their children…and 0% of White parents whom he asked have ever had the talk with their kids. These statistics alone should tell us that there is a huge racial injustice in our nation....

Weekly News of the Church

Walkway Repairs Tuesday & Wednesday We are repairing and staining the cement walkway this week! This is the area by the main entryway of the church and the church office. Please note that there will be no access to the church office, sanctuary, or janitor closet on Tuesday or Wednesday of this week, while the work is being done and the walkway completely dries. There will also be no access to Moore Hall from the north side, so if you need to enter Moore Hall or the kitchen, please use the south side entrances. This is the final large-scale project of our successful capital campaign, “Maikai Hana Hou” (Creating Goodness & Beauty Once Again). Thanks to everyone who helped and financially supported the campaign! ***Please do NOT walk on the walkway until Thursday morning!*** ____________________________________________________ Happy Independence Day! The church office will be closed on the 4th of July. We wish you a festive holiday! ____________________________________________________ This is an Email Scam: How are you..Have you got a minute ? I need you to complete a task for me discreetly. P.S. I am in a meeting now and can’t talk , so just reply here. I will be expecting a read from you soon. Thanks Rev. Dr. Alan Akana Although you should never let your guard down for email scams, summer is a particularly vulnerable time for church members, since church funds are often short and churches are asking members to catch up on pledges and even make additional gifts to help pay the bills. This is actually the case for us and you will be hearing more about it in our July newsletter...

A Message from Kahu Akana

  On Sunday, we read three conversations between Jesus and his disciples (or “would be” disciples) from the Gospel of Luke, chapter 9. In the first conversation, the Apostle John was very concerned about a man casting out demons in the name of Jesus. He tried to stop the man because he didn’t hang out with Jesus and the disciples. Jesus responded to John, “Do not stop him; for whoever is not against you is for you.” There are some people who say that these were literal demons: servants of Satan who were sent by him to torment people. Other people say that these were figurative demons: causes to which we assign negative spiritual energy. Whichever way you choose to interpret this passage (literally or metaphorically), the point is that the disciples encountered some people whose lives were tortured by forces that seemed beyond their control and a man who was freeing those people from their bondage of fear and pain—and he was doing so in the name of Jesus. Apparently, Jesus celebrates any time a person shows compassion to another person—even if that person isn’t the kind of person who hangs out with him and his disciples. The way of Jesus allows people—even if they are different from us, come from different places and backgrounds, and hang out with strangers—to show compassion to others. In our Scripture reading, Jesus also pointed out the importance of making the reign (kingdom) of God our top priority in life. Those who follow in the way of Jesus put the reign of God ahead of obligations placed upon us by family and...